Muvaffak Gozaydin: Online Education in the Next Ten Years

By Muvaffak Gozaydin

[Note: This article was originally posted as comments on Jim Shimabukuro’s “MIT LINC 2013: ‘Consistent but Stupid.’” -Editor]

Muvaffak Gozaydin, Istanbul, Turkey, Tuvalu; President, ONLINE Education Co Non-profit

Muvaffak Gozaydin, Istanbul, Turkey, Tuvalu; President, ONLINE Education Co Non-profit

Here are my forecastings for U.S. higher ed (HE) in the next 10 years:

1. Only 100 or so research universities will survive.

2. They will develop very good online courses for their digital divisions.

3. Digital divisions will provide credits and degrees as MITx, HarvardX, StanfordX, etc.

4. Fees will be $ 1-10 per course so everybody can go to any school they want.

5. More than 60% of the people, 25-65 years old, will have degrees as Obama asks.

6. Graduates will find jobs easily since they graduated from good schools.

7. States will sell the land and buildings of the state schools and will generate funds to retrain the 2 million jobless teachers.

8. There will be no subsidy for higher ed (HE), therefore citizens will pay less State taxes.

9. There will be no subsidy from the Federal Government, therefore there won’t be $1 trillion loans and Federal tax will be less, too.

10. Money will flow into the U.S. from foreign students.

11. The Pentagon will be happy since there will be sufficient students for STEM.

12. Eighty percent of the students in digital divisions will be foreigners.

13. Most nations will be thankful to the U.S. for solving their HE problem.

14. Yes, even good MOOCs will be disrupting the education world but, to me, in a good way. Sure, politicians should advance with very careful steps like edX is doing. I say Coursera is moving too fast.

15. Somewhow GNP will increase, too.

Please comment where I am wrong and right.

Thanks a billion to all.

6 Responses

  1. […] By Muvaffak Gozaydin [Note: This article was originally posted as comments on Jim Shimabukuro's "MIT LINC 2013: ‘Consistent but Stupid.’" -Editor] Here are my forecastings for U.S. higher ed (HE) i…  […]

  2. These fifteen predictions should stimulate lots of commentary. Coming from an expert outside of the U.S. and in a country moving rapidly into online education for all, this is doubly true. It’s far to easy for Americans and Western Europeans to miss what’s happening in the rest of the world.

    I have commented on the original postings and won’t repeat that all here. I’ll just note that the concept that Coursera is moving too fast may miss just how fast EVERYTHING is moving in this area. If you don’t move rapidly, you may miss the train (or boat or plane or whichever metaphor you choose). Put yourself in a position to deal with the changes even if you are early. You’ll be there when the time comes. It’s hard to control outside events and timing. It’s easy to be late to the party and lose out.

    I don’t know whether Coursera is moving too fast. I suspect it won’t hurt them if they are.

  3. […] Here are my forecastings for U.S. higher ed (HE) in the next 10 years…  […]

  4. […] By Muvaffak Gozaydin [Note: This article was originally posted as comments on Jim Shimabukuro's "MIT LINC 2013: ‘Consistent but Stupid.’" -Editor] Here are my forecastings for U.S. higher ed (HE) i…  […]

  5. Just I saw comments of Harry:
    Coursera is moving fast means ,

    they are not careful to select new members,

    brand name is important for demand of everything including education .

    I do not want to hurt Coursera at all Daphne Koller is from my university.
    Plus she is a marketing genius .

  6. As an engineering graduate student, I would say online education can’t replace traditional education especially in engineering curriculum. I took many lab courses and I got my hands dirty to some level. I believe virtual labs can’t enhance the quality of understanding a basic stress-strain curve without personally experience of observing and touching the test specimen.

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