‘YouTube Copyright School’ – Remixed and Mixed Up

Claude AlmansiBy Claude Almansi
Editor, Accessibility Issues
ETCJ Associate Administrator

In his lecture, “The Architecture of Access to Scientific Knowledge: Just How Badly We Have Messed This Up” (at CERN, Geneva, CH. April 18, 2011), Lawrence Lessig discussed YouTube’s new copyright school. (See 35:42 – 39:46 in the subtitled and transcribed video of his lecture.) The YouTube Copyright School video he showed and commented was uploaded by YouTube on March 24, 2011, then integrated into what looks like an  interactive tutorial, also entitled YouTube Copyright School, with a quiz on the side.

More information about this “school” was given on the YouTube Official Blog in “YouTube Copyright Education (Remixed)” (April 14, 2011):

If we receive a copyright notification for one of your videos, you’ll now be required to attend YouTube Copyright School, which involves watching a copyright tutorial and passing a quiz to show that you’ve paid attention and understood the content before uploading more content to YouTube.

YouTube has always had a policy to suspend users who have received three uncontested copyright notifications. This policy serves as a strong deterrent to copyright offenders. However, we’ve found that in some cases, a one-size-fits-all suspension rule doesn’t always lead to the right result. Consider, for example, a long-time YouTube user who received two copyright notifications four years ago but who’s uploaded thousands of legitimate videos since then without a further copyright notification. Until now, the four-year-old notifications would have stayed with the user forever despite a solid track record of good behavior, creating the risk that one new notification – possibly even a fraudulent notification – would result in the suspension of the account. We don’t think that’s reasonable. So, today we’ll begin removing copyright strikes from user’s accounts in certain limited circumstances, contingent upon the successful completion of YouTube Copyright School, as well as a solid demonstrated record of good behavior over time. Expiration of strikes is not guaranteed, and as always, YouTube may terminate an account at any time for violating our Terms of Service.

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Computer Science – A Field of Dreams

By Robert Plants

[Editor’s Note: This article was written in response to Bonnie Bracey Sutton‘s call for submissions from selected writers. Bonnie is ETCJ’s editor of policy issues, and the focus of her call was Erik W. Robelen’s “Schools Fall Behind in Offering Computer Science” (Education Week, 7.14.10); WebCite version. -js]

You can’t build it and expect people to come. We cite statistics on what is and what isn’t but fail to dig into the symptoms. We point out initiatives that may influence supply and demand but don’t go on to look at what influences K-12 education that results in the dearth of interest in computer science. In most states, the emphasis lies in producing enough teachers to staff the education that we have. We have an educational system focused on a standardized curriculum, rote memorization, nationalized testing, curriculum standards. Dig a little deeper and you will find that the structure of schooling is about the little red brick building we have always known, grades, classrooms, curriculum, teaching strategies – one size fits all. In many ways, our system of schooling has not changed in 100 years. Continue reading

We Need an Eco-Smart Model for Online Learning

Jim ShimabukuroBy Jim Shimabukuro
Editor

Two articles that appeared in my Google alerts today (7.17.10) grabbed my attention. Both were out of California. One was a San Francisco Chronicle editorial blasting the University of California’s vision of an internet-delivered bachelor’s degree program.

The other was an op-ed by James Fay and Jane Sjogren, sharing their vision of a hypothetical Golden State Online, or GSO, a “stand-alone online community college campus.”

On the surface, the visions seem to be quite different, and the viewpoints are obviously different. However, below the surface, both visions share a common flaw — they’re based on models of online learning that are, in my opinion, simply not sustainable.

This got me thinking about an alternative model that would be infinitely sustainable. After a few starts and stops, I came up with an eco-smart model for online learning, or E-SMOL. Continue reading

JRTE Spring 2010 Issue – A Sacrilegious Review

Jim ShimabukuroBy Jim Shimabukuro
Editor

Three of the four articles that make up the spring 2010 issue (v42n3) of Journal of Research on Technology in Education caught my attention more for their assumptions than their stated purposes. These assumptions highlight, for me, some of the weaknesses inherent in efforts to introduce technology into schools and colleges.

In “Technology’s Achilles Heel: Achieving High-Quality Implementation,” the “heel” for Gene E. Hall is school and college administrators. According to Hall, “Education technology scholars and practitioners are engaged with some of the most promising and interesting innovations.” However, these innovations don’t find their way into classrooms because of the failure of administrators to implement them. Thus, our enlightened ed tech guiding lights are “confronted first hand with the challenges associated with disappointing implementation efforts and failures to go to scale.” Continue reading

UNESCO, World Anti-Piracy Observatory and YouTube

Accessibility 4 All by Claude Almansi

Content:

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YouTube, Geoblocks and Proxies

Accessibility 4 All by Claude Almansi
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Geoblocking as censoreship measure Continue reading

Learning Styles and the Online Student: Moving Beyond Reading

Lynn ZimmermannBy Lynn Zimmerman
Editor, Teacher Education

In his January 30, 2010 article, Reading Ability As a ‘New’ Challenge for Online Students, Jim Shimabukuro focused on the connection between reading skills and the online environment. As a teacher educator, this issue is one of my concerns about online education.  In today’s online environment those who communicate and process well by reading and writing are at a definite advantage, while students who learn and process in other ways may not adapt as easily. As Jim pointed out – reading is more than being able to decode and comprehend words. Therefore, if we want to meet the learning needs of all students, we have to take different ways of learning and processing into account, and use a variety of strategies and techniques to promote learning (see Howard Gardner’s webs site about Multiple Intelligences http://www.howardgardner.com/MI/mi.html or the Illinois Online Network’s page called Learning Styles and the Online Environment at http://www.ion.uillinois.edu/resources/tutorials/id/learningStyles.asp )

Part of the answer is having technology that will handle audio and video, which can be a challenge. For example, this semester I am teaching a class online that I usually teach as a hybrid. There is a video clip that I usually show my students and after determining that I would not be infringing copyright, I enlisted the aid of our AV people to put the clip into a format that my online students could view. It works great if you are using one of the computers in their computer lab. However, for some reason that no one can pinpoint, the link will not work properly everywhere. On the computer in my office on campus, I get audio only. At home, I get nothing. My students are supposed to watch this clip next week and I have no idea how many of them will actually be able to view it, despite the best efforts of our AV people to make it available in a variety of formats.

On a more positive note, I did have success using Adobe Presenter to record audio onto the PowerPoint presentations that the students will view. In this way, those who prefer to listen can do that and those who prefer to read can read the notes that are part of the presentation. I also located some YouTube videos that I assigned instead of readings on a couple of topics.

However, I have not yet come up with a plan for the students’ being able to produce audio or video clips instead of writing. There are options, of course, but again access to technology can be an issue. I considered asking students to upload an audio or video file as one assignment, but rejected that idea because of the possible problems with technology. I want the students to spend time on the content, not on learning new technology. The best scenario, as far as I’m concerned, would be to have one or two synchronous online discussions using Skype, or similar technology so that students could talk to one another. Maybe next, I can develop something along that line.

To be most effective as a learning tool, online technology has to evolve to the point that students can readily use the skills they already have in addition to (perhaps, while learning) these new skills.

While I agree with Jim,  that “the reading tasks online are therefore a significant departure from the traditional, and they require a whole new set of skills,” I think we need to look at the issue from another direction, too. To be most effective as a learning tool, online technology has to evolve to the point that students can readily use the skills they already have in addition to (perhaps, while learning) these new skills. Otherwise, rather than being an educational equalizer, the online environment will be just another way that we sift and sort students. We will lose those who can’t adapt easily, and we will be educating only those who can.