Verbling, Touchscreens, Tablets, Smartphones etc.

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Online Education Programs Tackle Student Cheating by Ryan Lytle from US News & World Report
Lytle reports on various issues involved in online courses such as cheating on tests and plagiarism. Representatives from several universities point out that these are not just issues in the online classroom and offer their suggestions for reducing the problems. Sometimes the solution means making a choice between academic integrity and access. A university student commented that she thinks the most effective way to avoid cheating and plagiarism is for faculty to “to take a hard stand against students who violate class policies.”

Students learn better with star trek-style touchscreen desks from PopSci
A three-year study from the UK shows that students using interactive technology developed better math skills than their peers who were taught using traditional methods. The results suggest that using touchscreen desks improves students’ critical thinking abilities.

Language Learning Service Verbling Launches Google Hangouts-Powered Classes, Adds Support For 9 New Languages by Rip Empson from Tech Crunch
Empson overviews the launch of Verbling, an online language learning website that pairs learners and native speakers for video chats.

How tablets are invading the classroom by Simon Hill from Digital Trends
Hill gives an overview of the various tablets and the trends in integrating them into the classroom. Digital textbooks and tests are just two of the trends he focuses on, as well as the growing number of users who have their own tablets. At the end of the article he asks readers to respond to the question of whether they are the answer for integrating technology into education and which seems to be the best fit.  

Young teens in U.S. use mobile devices for homework by Patricia Reaney from Reuters
In this short article, Reaney gives information about the use of mobile devices, such as SmartPhones and laptops, by young people for more than entertainment.

Using Technology to Reach Unreachable Students by Ben Johnson from Edutopia
Using anecdotal evidence from his own teaching experiences and results from a study done in the UK on iPad usage by students, Johnson reports that iPads are effective in improving students’ “engagement, collaboration, and perseverance.”

Does the Use of Twitter Improve Education? by George Couros from Connected Principals
Couros says the answer is definitely “yes” and “no.” As with all technology Twitter use impacts education depending on how it is used. He suggests it is effective when used to follow and learn from other educators.”

Will school computers be able to handle new testing technology? from Digital
The new standardized tests that are aligned to the Common Core State Standards have specific technology requirements. Schools with older technology will probably have to upgrade in order to administer the tests.

Digital Wake-Up Call  by Erich Strom from Scholastic
This article discusses equity issues as education moves more toward computerized standardize testing.

2 Responses

  1. […] by Ryan Lytle from US News & World Report. Lytle reports on various issues involved in online courses such as cheating on tests and plagiarism. Representatives from several universities point out that these are not just issues in the online classroom and offer their suggestions for reducing the problems. Sometimes the solution means making a choice between academic integrity and access….  […]

  2. […] Educational Technology and Change Journal …. At the end of the article he asks readers to respond to the question of whether they are the answer for integrating technology into education and which seems to be the best fit.  […]

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